CCDV Message Board CCDV Message Board

Go Back   CCDV Message Board > Corvette Discussion > Car Care & Detailing

Car Care & Detailing Discuss products, methods and tips


Post New Thread Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-27-13, 11:28 PM   #1
LOHpilot
CCDV Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Ocean View, DE
Posts: 107
LOHpilot is on a distinguished road
White Powder Aluminum Oxide on Engine Components

Today I lifted the hood of my C6 to show the engine to a Corvette enthusiast and former owner, and he remarked about the white powdery substance on aluminum components such as the alternator, throttle body, and I believe the power steering pump. I think this is aluminum oxide as form of corrosion on aluminum that can wipe off on the finger tip as a fine white powder. Is there a method and cleaning agent to clean this powder off and a way to seal the component to prevent this from occurring?
LOHpilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-13, 07:44 AM   #2
carboman
CCDV Club Member
 
carboman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: HV PA
Posts: 4,779
carboman has a little shameless behaviour in the past
There's no easy way to remove and prevent this. Best I've found is to use a small brass bristle brush to remove the buildup and then wipe the part down with a rag that you've sprayed with WD-40. That will help prevent the buildup from returning too quickly. If you want help with this you're welcome to come by. I'm always up for an afternoon of mini brush and Q-Tip detailing

Harbor Freight has the brushes for under 50 cents http://www.harborfreight.com/1-3-8-e...ush-40441.html

You'd have to remove each component, disassemble it, polish it and clear coat it to completely prevent this from happening.
__________________
Founder and CPO (Chief Pouring Officer) of The Liquid Assets Lounge
Host of Boys Night Out Episodes I-XIII
Celebrating the 21st Amendment
Married to the greatest woman in the world

Last edited by carboman; 05-28-13 at 07:52 AM.
carboman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-13, 09:08 AM   #3
LOHpilot
CCDV Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Ocean View, DE
Posts: 107
LOHpilot is on a distinguished road
Thanks Carboman for the tips. I would think disassembling each component is a bit beyond the scope of what I want to do. I do have a small wire brush and some old toothbrushes to see about cleaning the corrosion off and leave a light film of WD-40. If you were to seal the component, what would you use?
LOHpilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-13, 11:38 AM   #4
carboman
CCDV Club Member
 
carboman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: HV PA
Posts: 4,779
carboman has a little shameless behaviour in the past
To seal it I would suggest a couple of coats of clear high temp spray paint. Clear (or any color) powder coat would be better but would require removal, ext. You'd need to thoroughly degrase and clean the parts before attempting any coatings.

Make sure to use BRASS brushes since regular wire brushes may gouge the aluminum. You can use very fine steel wool as well. Tooth brushes may not do much. You can dip the brushes, etc in WD-40 to clean the corrosion off. While you're at it take a look at the chassis ground connections and give them a cleaning if they appear at all corroded.
__________________
Founder and CPO (Chief Pouring Officer) of The Liquid Assets Lounge
Host of Boys Night Out Episodes I-XIII
Celebrating the 21st Amendment
Married to the greatest woman in the world

Last edited by carboman; 05-28-13 at 11:42 AM.
carboman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-13, 07:10 PM   #5
LOHpilot
CCDV Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Ocean View, DE
Posts: 107
LOHpilot is on a distinguished road
I took your suggestion with the WD-40 and did a precursory attempt to clean the oxidation. My car has a birthdate of 12/4/12, so I reasoned that the extent of exposure was not too bad. I dampened a cotton cloth with WD-40 and lightly rubbed the oxidation away and yield shiny clean metal. I was able to approach a majority of the affected areas but I will go a bit deeper when I breakout the box of 500 Q-Tips to further attack the issue.
LOHpilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-13, 08:10 PM   #6
carboman
CCDV Club Member
 
carboman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: HV PA
Posts: 4,779
carboman has a little shameless behaviour in the past
Glad to hear it worked well for you. FYI the the small throw away foam paint brushes work well in some spots.
__________________
Founder and CPO (Chief Pouring Officer) of The Liquid Assets Lounge
Host of Boys Night Out Episodes I-XIII
Celebrating the 21st Amendment
Married to the greatest woman in the world
carboman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-13, 06:55 AM   #7
92RAGTOP
Super Moderator
 
92RAGTOP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 4,117
92RAGTOP is an unknown quantity at this point
Aluminum does corrode. It is very susceptible to galvanic corrosion. That's one of the reasons you see anodes on boat out-drives. If you don't have them on a boat the aluminum out- drive will look like a half dissolved Alka-Seltzer in a few years. Don't try to paint or coat it because it will simply begin to corrode under the paint and corrode at a higher rate. The only thing you can do is clean it off with a high quality aluminum wheel cleaner and with some elbow grease polish it. Test a small section first, some commercial aluminum cleaners are so strong they can darken the aluminum.

92RAGTOP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-13, 10:23 AM   #8
carboman
CCDV Club Member
 
carboman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: HV PA
Posts: 4,779
carboman has a little shameless behaviour in the past
Don,

It's not galvanic corrosionon underhood parts, it's more like oxidation in most cases. Also, as for clear/powder coating aluminum, every aluminum Corvette wheel is painted or clear coated.


Galvanic corrosion (also called ' dissimilar metal corrosion' or wrongly 'electrolysis') refers to corrosion damage induced when two dissimilar materials are coupled in a corrosive electrolyte.

When a galvanic couple forms, one of the metals in the couple becomes the anode and corrodes faster than it would all by itself, while the other becomes the cathode and corrodes slower than it would alone. For galvanic corrosion to occur, three conditions must be present:

Electrochemically dissimilar metals must be present
These metals must be in electrical contact, and
The metals must be exposed to an electrolyte
The relative nobility of a material can be predicted by measuring its corrosion potential. The well known galvanic series lists the relative nobility of certain materials in sea water. A small anode/cathode area ratio is highly undesirable. In this case, the galvanic current is concentrated onto a small anodic area. Rapid thickness loss of the dissolving anode tends to occur under these conditions. Galvanic corrosion problems should be solved by designing to avoid these problems in the first place.

The relative nobility of a material can be predicted by measuring its corrosion potential. The well known galvanic series lists the relative nobility of certain materials in sea water. A small anode/cathode area ratio is highly undesirable. In this case, the galvanic current is concentrated onto a small anodic area. Rapid thickness loss of the dissolving anode tends to occur under these conditions. Galvanic corrosion problems should be solved by designing to avoid these problems in the first place. Galvanic corrosion cells can be set up on the macroscopic level or on the microscopic level. On the microstructural level, different phases or other microstructural features can be subject to galvanic currents.
__________________
Founder and CPO (Chief Pouring Officer) of The Liquid Assets Lounge
Host of Boys Night Out Episodes I-XIII
Celebrating the 21st Amendment
Married to the greatest woman in the world
carboman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-13, 04:30 PM   #9
rosey
CCDV Club Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: mullica hill nj
Posts: 17
rosey is on a distinguished road
LoHpilot, You may want to try Eastwood Diamond Clear Coat,satin firish after cleaning aluminum. You can read about this product on Eastwood web site. I used it on aluminum wheels. It prevents future oxidation. I have a quart you can have if you like to try it.
rosey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-13, 09:20 PM   #10
92RAGTOP
Super Moderator
 
92RAGTOP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 4,117
92RAGTOP is an unknown quantity at this point
Quote:
Originally Posted by carboman View Post
Don,

It's not galvanic corrosionon underhood parts, it's more like oxidation in most cases. Also, as for clear/powder coating aluminum, every aluminum Corvette wheel is painted or clear coated.
Hi Mark I suggested he use aluminum wheel cleaner to clean the aluminum under his hood, not his painted wheels.

I'm not 100% convinced it isn't galv. corr. I've seen aluminum heat sinks inside closed electronic devices that have that white powder on it, as well as pitting. This type of corrosion can happen to aluminum if there is a high voltage leak close by. There is another theory that over time a type salt leaches out of some aluminum. Don't know about that though?
92RAGTOP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-13, 03:44 PM   #11
carboman
CCDV Club Member
 
carboman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: HV PA
Posts: 4,779
carboman has a little shameless behaviour in the past
Don, I was referring to you saying NOT to clear coat or paint the aluminum parts since they will corrode under the coating.
__________________
Founder and CPO (Chief Pouring Officer) of The Liquid Assets Lounge
Host of Boys Night Out Episodes I-XIII
Celebrating the 21st Amendment
Married to the greatest woman in the world
carboman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 12:15 PM   #12
LOHpilot
CCDV Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Ocean View, DE
Posts: 107
LOHpilot is on a distinguished road
Thanks for all the feedback. This is the result of being a member of a like minded group of people who help to further the knowledge of others in the club.

I have some foam paint brushes around the garage and now I have another purpose for them. I do subscribe to the Eastwood web site, so I will look up the solution to treat the aluminum auxiliary parts.

I have seen aluminum parts under an engine bay go to hell in a hand basket after many years of neglect. Fortunately for me, my car is only a few months old and I now have the info to keep the oxidation in check.
LOHpilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Post New Thread Reply

Tags
aluminum, components, engine, oxide, powder, white


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
powder coating Aquavet Product/Service Recommendations 4 06-04-07 04:09 PM
Aluminum Wheels Dennis Trayes Parts For Sale/Wanted 1 02-18-07 08:25 PM
Powder Coating????? FINEST-RACING Racing 3 03-03-06 01:24 PM
66/67 Aluminum Intake Plain Insane Parts For Sale/Wanted 2 12-22-05 11:31 PM
Powder Coating GoVetteGo Off Topic 1 04-03-04 07:00 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.